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kalika 7

In this work, the choreographer questions human psychology and its ability to live with its fears. A perpetual physical and mental fight against his own demons to find a necessary balance to serenity.
In this experiment, the dancers find their reflection in their "energetic" mirrors works of the painter AKALIKA which are projected on vertical rollers to create an interactive scenography.

Creation: 2015

Duration: 60 min

Artistic Direction & choreography: Olé Khamchanla

Dancers: Alice Chihya Peng, Lola Kervroedan, Emeline N'Guyen,

David Bernardo, Anthony Michelet, Rafaël Smadja, Olé Khamchanla

Music: Léo Jourdain

Light: Lise Poyol

Video: Jessica Farinet

Photos: Jessica Farinet

Production: Compagnei KHAM

Coproduction: Le Pacifique I CDC Grenoble, Le TARMAC scène internationale francophone Paris,

l’Espace Paul Jargot à Crolles,

le Centre de Développement Chorégraphique Les Hivernales Avignon

Support: DRAC et Région Auvergne - Rhône-Alpes, Conseil Général de la Drôme, Institut Français de Singapour, National Arts Council de Singapour, Spedidam,

Residency: Le Pacifique I CDC Grenoble, Frontier Danceland studio à Singapour,  Espace Jargot à Crolles, Pôle Pik, Théâtre de Privas.

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Tour

2018

APRIL-------------------------------------- 5 - Théâtre du Vellein - Villefontaine

Press

"Olé Khamchanla combines his Laotian origins with a plastic universe to launch, with six other dancers, in a room full of shadows and poetry."

N. Yokel, The Terrace

 

"Akalika7 looks like a rough crossing of the Styx, can display energy close to African dance, and body images reminiscent of ankoku butô, the darkest avatar of this Japanese dance inspired by Artaud and Expressionism. seven performers display impressive vital and rebellious energy. "

T. Hahn, Dancing-Historic Canal

"The choreographer manages to produce a piece without any gestural pretension, without any virtuoso research, and always perfectly arranged. After hammering his words with sheared amplified pebbles, Olé Khamchanla slows the tempo to the extreme in the variation (he offers us face covered by abundant hair), towards the finale of his opus."

N. Villodre, Mouvement.net